Linda’s Peacock, Elephant and Unicorn!

Linda has done 3 fantastic projects and shows how a little embellishment can add do much to a finished embroidery!

The first is her Peacock:

from Linda:

I’m sending a photo of my latest finished wall hanging, your art deco peacock.  As you can see, I did a bit of editing and added a double swirl to the inside area of the peacock where there was a large, open space.  I used the same color thread as for the first swirl, Your thread number 2852, Light Green Amber, which looks like a soft, golden beige, and I love how it blends with the background fabric, yet still shows up and doesn’t compete with the Peacock.  Thanks for the lovely design. P.S.  I forgot to say I “crystalized” the peacock, using three colors of Swarovski crystals, Lt. Turquoise, Topaz and Crystal Meridian Blue.  They went so well with the colors of the design.

BFC1476 Large Decorative Peacock

Next her Bull Elephant:

Look what I did with your Indian Elephant design, BFC 1545.  I found a use for all that fancy beaded fringe I bought, on sale, and had no idea what I was going to do with it!  This design was really fun, and only 6 colors were used!  I gave this elephant a name- I call him “Bull-E”, my sad play on words, but it can stand just for bull elephant.  Thank you for the joy.  Laura

BFC1545 Large Decorative Indian Elephant

And her Unicorns:

Just finished this.  It’s for my 10 year old granddaughter for Christmas.  It turned out almost glowing! For whatever reason, using the mottled, royal blue background, seems to make the unicorns almost look 3D.  FYI, when the embroidery was finished, because of my choice of thread colors, there wasn’t as much definition as I wanted.  Guess what!  A number 2 common pencil worked great to get the details to stand out.  Thanks for the great design.

Yep, it is eyelash yarn.  A good number of years ago I found 2 hanks of it in the remnant bin at Walmart.  One was green and the other aqua.  I believe I had one of your mermaid designs I wanted to do and the yarn reminded me of seaweed.  Once I embroidered the design I then couched the yarn on to make an underwater scene.  Since then I have used that yarn a number of different ways and as hangers on 4 different wall hangings.  It adds a bit of unexpected texture.  It also proves there is a reason we are confirmed stash builders! We never know when we will use a treasure we have stashed.

BFC1749 A Mother Unicorn’s Love

Beth’s Embroidered Pictures

Beth has developed a wonderful way to finish large picture embroideries!  She has given me permission to include her method and i’m sure a lot of you will appreciate being able to do this too.

From Beth:

I finished the BFC580 design and thought you might like seeing what I did.  I combined the six sections in software, added an  edited design to create the inside window frame to complete the look of a window.  I have a Babylock Destiny and Designer’s Gallery software. This software gives me the ability to combine designs very well.  Also attached is a jpeg of design BFC1601.  Zigzagging the sections together did not appeal to me so I combined them into one design.  Added together there were 305506 stitches and I wasn’t sure it would work, but you can see that it did, and computers didn’t crash.

I am embroidering pictures like this on fusible pellon. For large projects I also fuse the back fabric (usually black) to pellon and then sew the front and back together along the edge to make it very sturdy to put on a table top easel. After the front and back sections are sewn together and trimmed to size, the edge is satin stitched to finish.

I am an experienced embroider and I have made many embroidery designs into pictures to display on an easel. My limitation is only the size of my magnetic 9.5 x 14 hoop.  For the tabletop easel I wouldn’t need something to be any bigger.  I like your designs very much.  I also like the thread you sell so much I bought every color. Your “Blue Study with Birds” would not have been possible without all of your blue threads.

I have not been bored sequestering at home during the pandemic.  I am blessed to be able to enjoy a creative hobby like machine embroidery, and talented people like you are included in the blessings.  I am not talented, but I have learned a skill. I can thread a machine, step on the gas, and thoroughly enjoy being creative.  I retired in 2011 and I don’t think there have been many days that I haven’t spent time at my machine.

It made me smile when I read that you would like to put my embroidery pictures on your blog.  It’s not often that you can show off something creative that you love to do to kindred spirits who would share the same creative interest. This technique for making embroidered pictures to display on an easel began just before the world was told to sequester at home to prevent the spread of the pandemic.

Surfing Youtube in December 2019  I came across a New Zealand web site, www.kreativekiwiembroidery.co.nz.  Heather calls herself a machine embroidery addict enabler and she digitizes large ITH table mats and mug rugs using pellon and water soluble stabilizer. I was intrigued, bought a design, and quickly realized that the very sturdy edge she created for these designs would work, with a little editing, to make frames for embroidered pictures.  The sturdy edge would hold up with lots of handling and abuse. and the pellon would be sufficient support on an easel.  I have been collecting designs that would make beautiful pictures for decades and now with a few inches of fabric, pellon and water soluble stabilizer, Heather has enabled me to be able to make many pictures to display and enjoy in my embroidery machine.  At this point I have made over sixty pictures using quilt blocks, applique and embroidery designs.  They don’t take up very much room to store and I can change pictures to display quickly and as often as I want to.  Seasonal designs have become a focus decoration, but I display something all of the time.

For frames I use Heather’s 8X10 ITH rectangular coaster (ITHRC).  I edit out everything but the edge which has a placement stitch thread run, tack down thread run, and a third thread run for extra security that is stitched before the face fabric and back fabric are trimmed away.  Then a zigzag stitch and final satin stitch topped with the decorative stitch is sewn to finish.  The witch and Christmas bird are examples of this framing.

This framing design has rounded corners and being circular is resized easily without distortion.  I have not been able to find a framing design with 90 degree corners that will resize very much without noticeable distortion, meaning the width of the top and bottom of the rectangle may be wider or more narrow than the sides depending on how dimensions are altered.  If a picture requires a square corner I manually stitch the satin stitch edge.  The attached Ladybug design is an example of my manual edge.

In the software the edited frame design is added to a selected embroidery design.  The frame dimensions are adjusted to fit with the embroidery design and the two combined and saved as a new design. Resizing the embroidery design is also works.  I usually use one layer of water soluble stabilizer and I only use the nonwoven fabric like wash- away stabilizer.  I prewash my face fabric and back fabric to avoid possible shrinkage causing problems.  Pellon cut from a bolt will usually need to be ironed flat using a non-stick applique pressing sheet.  I found it’s best to use a light fuse, no steam, to fuse the face fabric to the pellon to avoid hard wrinkles.  Very dense designs can cause distortion if the fabric is bonded too tightly.  Any problems can usually be steam ironed away as the design is pressed flat after drying.

The embroidery is completed before the back fabric is attached.  To make the back of the picture look the best I prefer to pin the back fabric to a piece of non-fusible pellon before securing it to the back of the hoop.  I use 4 flat head pins to secure corners of the back fabric, not tape.

I re-run the placement, tack down and securing thread stops to attach the back fabric.  The hoop is removed from the machine and the back fabric is trimmed away first. After the face fabric is trimmed, the hoop is back on the machine to complete the zigzag stitching and satin stitching. The stabilizer is dissolved and thoroughly rinsed. away and after drying the picture usually requires a little steam ironing to flatten.

Your Stained Glass daisy design was easily adapted for displaying on an easel.  After centering fused fabric with pins all of the colors were sewn except for the black stain glass stitching.  To be able to add the back fabric I just had added a color stop in the software at the point where the black stain glass stitching moved to the edge.  By moving to and repeating the added color stop, the back fabric could to be attached and secured before the fabric was trimmed away and the edge completed. Depending on how designs have been created or combined it is often necessary to move forward and back through color stops as necessary to achieve goals for creating a picture.

I hope this information is helpful and clear.  Please use and edit as much of it as you see fit in your blog.

BFC1204 Ching Chou’s Barn Owl

BFC1567 Ching Chou’s Stained Glass Ladybug

 

BFC1202 Ching

BFC1202 Ching Chou’s Hummingbird

BFC0580 Blue Study with Birds

BFC1005 Fantasy Ladies – Fairy Witchery

 

BFC1481 Stained Glass Floral Squares

 

 

 

Agnes’ Stitches for her Church

From Agnes:  They brought tears to Monsignor Mitas’s eyes and I never expected that reaction.  When I gave him the Easter one in Holy Thursday, the reverence with which he held the parament was something to be witnessed.  That is how powerful these designs are.

 

BFC1144 Window-Christ Resurrected

BFC0495 Window-The Nativity

Laura’s Elephants

Laura had a lot of trouble in the beginning getting this design lined up.  But I was shocked when she sent me the photo and it came out so beautiful!  I think she was doing a lot better than she thought. 🙂  Thank you Laura for making my design look so great!

From Laura,

Well, here is the finished product from my almost nervous breakdown!  Thank you again for all your help with BFC 445, Touch of India II.  It’s a “Happy” wall hanging, full of beautiful colors.  I added lots of crystals and unique outline quilting.  The fabric I found at our local quilt shop, Creative Sew Threads, here in Elkhart, Indiana.  I think the fabric complemented the design perfectly.

BFC0445 Touch of India II

I did some closeups so you can see the details.

I like the quilting – you can see some of it better her.

Margaret O’s Undersea Quilt

Suz,

Thank you for these incredibly beautiful designs!! I expected something wonderful, but they were no less than spectacular! Your contributions to the Embroidery Community are invaluable. I would also like thank you for the thread conversion charts included with the design sets. As someone who has a variety of thread brands, I find them extremely helpful, appreciating the extra time and effort made to include them. I’m eagerly anticipating the thread chart coming soon from BFC. You will recognize designs from Sea Turtle Seascape, Endangered Hawksbill Turtle, UnderSea and Seahorse Fantasy. I used 3 layers of poly batting, feathered at the edges for the center, with single layer for the overall quilt.

Thank you,

Margaret O’

You can find the designs Margaret used in our Aquatic Category.https://bfc-creations.com/bfc-machine-embroidery-designs/animal-kingdom/aquatic/

Suz, Was just clearing out my inbox and happened to think you might like to know more regarding the find of fabric to match the coral. All fabric was from JoAnn’s, except for this one, a Batik found at Hobby Lobby. Fortunately, still have the quilt, so took a better closeup to show the fabric/coral combo. Thank you again for these gorgeous designs!!

Margaret – I just love your quilt!  You combined designs from different sets, found fabric that looked like it was made for this quilt and overall did a wonderful, creative job.  Thank you!  Suz

Judy’s Embellished Lady

From Judy:

My 1st try at embroidery with embellishments. She was so much fun to do. Will definitely be doing more with different ideas

BFC1928 An Embellished Lady

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We are currently having a contest in our IO Group focusing on this design.  Judy is our first entrant!  To enter to win prizes and reward points, join our IO group https://groups.io/g/BFC-Creations 

You will find instructions for this and our other Contest, Baby Animals, in the Files section of the group.  Thanks – Suz

And thank you Judy for doing such a great first entry!!!

Donna’s Under the Sea

Donna did a beautiful and very decorative Under the Sea Wall Hanging. I asked her about whether she had quilted through to the backing and this is her response:

I inspected and did not do any quilting after I put the backing on. It is loose. There was already so much stitching on the top that I did not do anymore There was fusible fleece under the top when I did all the stitching on it. Donna

I think this is fine for large heavy wall hangings! Especially when you have added things like beads, buttons, shells and crystal. If after finishing you project, the backing seems too loose, just ad a few hand stitches here and there to hold it in place.

Art Quilt – Undersea Fantasy

Sunny’s Gorgeous Asian Quilt

I’ve attached two jpgs of a quilt I made last year for our local quilt show.  It contains a Geisha panel and six Geisha heads from your sets, and on the back is a set of larger Samurai warriors.  It won second place in the wall hanging category!  It hangs with a bamboo rod.

Sunny

I can really see why this quilt won a prize!

 

BFC1137 Three Samurai II BFC1136 Three Samurai I